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Poorly Planned Lifting Operation Leads to Death of Worker
News

Two companies have been fined after a worker died during a lifting operation involving a crane.

Two companies have been fined after a worker died during a lifting operation involving a crane.

On 12th March 2012, Andrew Bowes was working for Larkin Eng Services Ltd as a metal fabricator on the company’s site in Furness. Larkin Eng Services Ltd had contracted Cumbria Design Scaffold Ltd to collect two large metal walkways and deliver them to a customer on their behalf, utilising a flatbed lorry with a mounted crane. Mr Bowes was assisting the lifting operation, as requested by his employer.

The first of the metal walkways had been lifted onto the back of the flatbed lorry, but had not been fastened down. As the mounted crane moved in order to pick up the second walkway, the sling became attached to the first, causing it to tip over and off the lorry. The walkway fell on top of Mr Bowes who suffered fatal crush injuries.

An investigation carried out by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) following the incident found that Cumbria Design Scaffold Ltd had failed to properly plan the lifting operation. They had failed to do a thorough risk assessment in order to highlight the potential risks to workers on site, and no safe system of work for a complex lift had been devised. The lifting operation was also found to be insufficiently supervised which the HSE felt led to the poor organisation and control of the operation, placing all workers involved at significant risk.

Mr Bowe’s employer, Larkin Eng Services Ltd, were found to have failed to ensure the safety of Mr Bowes, who had only been working for the company for one week and therefore was not experienced enough to be actively involved while the lifting operation was taking place.

HSE Inspector, Anthony Banks, commented “We would like to thank Andrew’s family for their patience throughout what has been a complex investigation. Companies should always ensure that lifting operations are properly planned, organised and conducted safely. Had this lifting operation been properly planned and supervised, then this tragedy could have been averted. HSE will take enforcement action against both clients and contractors who fail to meet the required standards.”

Cumbria Design Scaffold Lid pleaded guilty of breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, receiving a fine of £60,000, with further costs of £27,464.28. Larkin Eng Services Ltd pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, receiving a fine of £20,000, with further costs ordered of £27,211.09.

 

Source: SHP Online, Two companies fined following death of worker, 11th February 2019. Read the full article.

Construction Firm Fined £600k Following Excavator Death
News

A construction company has been fined £600,000 after an agency worker was killed by a excavator truck.

A construction company has been fined £600,000 after an agency worker was killed by a excavator truck.

On 5th December 2016, a former bus and tram depot was being redeveloped to provide student accommodation and an underground carpark. Vince Ramsey, an agency worker, had been employed by Allenbuild to complete work from the start of the project in August 2016.

Mr Ramsey was crouched down, respraying pain markings on the ground that may have been washed away or rubbed off by vehicles on site. It was reported that he was working at the bottom of a dirt ramp that provided access to the site in which the underground carpark was being constructed but it was also reported that he was known to use his own initiative for tasks, so was often moving around the site.

The excavator was being driven by an employee of Crummock, who had stopped in order to allow other vehicles to manoeuvre on the site. Once traffic had cleared, the driver moved the excavator forward, but he had limited visibility due to the volume of earth that the vehicle had excavated. The truck struck Mr Ramsey, running him over and the driver was only made aware of the situation when alerted by another worker on site who had seen the incident. Mr Ramsey sadly did not respond to resuscitation and was pronounced dead at the scene.

Allen build pleaded guilty of breaching Regulation 27(1) of the Construction (Design and Management) (CDM) Regulations 2015. Regulation 27 is a requirement for construction sites to have systems in place so pedestrians and vehicles can move without risks to health or safety. It was noted following the

During the hearing, the judge took into consideration that Allenbuild had no previous convictions and entered a guilty plea, taking responsibility for the incident. HSE inspector, Rob Hirst, commented “This was a tragic and wholly avoidable incident that arose due to the company’s failure to ensure that pedestrians were not carrying out work on or near traffic routes whilst vehicles were in operation.”

 

Source: Health and Safety at Work, Allenbuild fined £600k after agency worker killed by dumper truck, 4th February 2019. Read the full article.

Engineering Company Fined Following Overhead Crane Incident
News

An engineering company has been fined £48,024 after a heavy object fell from an overhead crane, injuring an employee.

An engineering company has been fined £48,024 after a heavy object fell from an overhead crane, injuring an employee.

On 10th August 2016, an employee was operating an overhead crane to move an item within the factory at Coronation Works in West Yorkshire, operated by Halifax Rack and Screw Cutting. The crane was positioned above an area of storage racking when it made contact with the hanging festoon cable that was supplying power to the crane, touching a heavy object on the top level of the racking.

The contact with the cable caused the object to dislodge from the racking, falling and striking the employee on the head. The employee suffered temporary blindness and long-term vision problems. On the incident, HSE inspector, Sally Gay, said “Being struck by a falling object is a major cause of death and injury, which can be easily prevented by taking simple steps. This incident could so easily have been avoided by simply carrying out correct control measures and safe working practices.”

Halifax Rack and Screw Cutting pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 10(1) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. In order to prevent injury to any persons on the premises, Regulation 10(1) requires employers to put steps in place to prevent material or objects falling from a height, as far as is reasonable.

Halifax Rack and Screw Cutting received a fine of £48,024, with further costs of £2,051.

 

Source: Health and Safety at Work, £48k fine after worker struck on head by falling object left with vision problems, 21st January 2019. Read the full article.

£1M Fine for Waste Company Following Reversing Vehicle Death
News

A major refuse collection company has been fined £1m after a worker was killed by a reversing vehicle.

A major refuse collection company has been fined £1m after a worker was killed by a reversing vehicle.

On 18th October 2013, Mr John Head was working for Veolia ES (UK) Limited at the Ross Depot Waste Transfer Station in Folkestone. He was walking across the yard and he was run over by a reversing refuse collection vehicle (RCV) and was pronounced dead that the scene.

Following the incident, an investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that multiple vehicles, including RCVs and articulated LGVs, where moving around the yard with no specific parameters in place to keep the movement of vehicles controlled. It was also found that Veolia had failed to adequately assess the risks associated with moving vehicles within the yard and had not applied any industry recognised control measures in order to protect pedestrians.

HSE inspector Kevin Golding, commented “This should be a reminder to all industries, but in particular, the waste industry, to appropriately assess the risks and implement widely recognised control measures to adequately control manoeuvring vehicles, in particular reversing vehicles and restrict pedestrian movements around vehicles.”

In October 2018, the HSE released their updates annual workplace fatality figures, which saw 12 recorded fatal injuries within the waste recycling sector between April 2017 and March 2018.

Veolia ES (UK) Limited were found guilty of breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. They received a fine of £1 million, with further costs of £130,000.

 

Source: SHP Online, Veolia fine: £1m after reversing vehicle death, 25th January 2019. Read the full article here.

RTITB Admin Closure – Friday 18th January 2019
News

The RTITB administration office will be closed from 12pm on Friday 18th Janaury 2019 for training purposes.

Our Administration team really want to provide you with the best service available and as part of this mission they will be attending customer service training on Friday 18th January 2019. This means the department will be closed from 12pm on Friday 18th and will reopen at 9am on Monday 21st January 2019.

Please send all queries during this time to the relevant team email address and the team will get back to you as soon as possible.

Thank you for your understanding and sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

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    21/01/2019 - 20/05/2019

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